Ten Commandments for Pastors


1. Give priority to your personal communion with God. Put your own soul first: your maintaining communion with God is a prerequisite for being an effective pastor to your people. “Take heed therefore unto yourselves, and to the flock, over the which the Holy Ghost hath made you overseers” (Acts 20:28).

2. Give priority to prayer and holiness. Undertake no sermon, no pastoral work, no task of the ministry without seeking God’s face in Jesus Christ. Follow John Bunyan’s advice, “You can do more than pray after you have prayed, but you cannot do more than pray until you have prayed.” Personal holiness is not only a necessary pursuit but a joyful one and is usually inseparable from divine success in the ministry.

3. Be bibline all your life. Be like Bunyan, of whom Spurgeon said, that if you pricked any vein, the blood that would flow out would be bibline. Read the Word, study the Word, believe the Word, pray over the Word, love the Word, live the Word, memorize the Word, meditate on the Word, sing the Word, and practice the Word.

4. Remember that preaching is the primary task of the ministry, and that to do it rightly, you need the Holy Spirit two times for every sermon: once in the study and then again on the pulpit.

5. Be profoundly thankful and humbled for the honor of being an ambassador of Jesus Christ. Remain convinced all your life that you have a crucial vocation, for you are dealing with never-dying souls for a never-ending eternity.

6. Preach Christ to the full. Be determined to know no man after the flesh—including yourself—and to glory in nothing except Jesus Christ and Him crucified, exalted, and coming again! Be a self-forgetter and a Christ-preacher. You can never preach Him enough. Devote the best energy of your life into preaching Him biblically, doctrinally, experientially, and practically. Resolve, like Thomas Boston, to leave the savor of Christ behind in all that you do.

7. Love the triune God; love your wife and children; love people; love your work.

8. Maintain a radical sense of dependency on the anointing of the Holy Spirit in all that you think, say, and do. Lean upon the Spirit at all times.

9. Ask God to give you a few, very close pastoral friends with whom you can hold each other accountable. Love your brethren in the ministry, and do not compete with them.

10. Live every day with an eternal perspective that fuels evangelistic urgency for the lost and pastoral love for the saints’ maturation. Keep eternity in view in all that you do, so that on the great day you may give a good account of your ministry and may hear your Master say, “Well done, thou good and faithful servant… enter thou into the joy of thy Lord” (Matt. 25:21)


  1. best wisdom i’v read/heard for those called of GOD,to that Servant-hood,as CHRIST our Savior learned/applied Hebew5:8.so thank you for this Acts14:22 helps to Pastors/undersheppards,here is wisdom.praying wide and effective publication.bless the HOLY SPIRIT.

  2. Thanks for the post Joel. I would only push back with the observation that all of these can be done without reference to others, except for #7 and #9, and only #7 seems to imply your church body; #9 seems to imply other pastors outside your church.

    I wonder if the me-and-Jesus mentality of many pastors shouldn’t be guarded by depth of relationship with their church, spouse, those above them and those below them. Going-it-alone (you’re certainly right in all points that our primary dependency is upon the Living God) not only hinders the task of preaching, but makes a pastor an island. Your list certainly doesn’t exclude what I’m saying, I just wonder if it could be more balanced?

    Are these concerns off base?

    Cf. something like this: http://www.thegospelcoalition.org/article/why-knowing-your-flock-is-critical-to-meaningful-preaching

  3. Anne

    Nothing about caring for the people?

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